Phaseout all fossil fuels – Climate Action Moreland signs Lofoten Declaration

September 26, 2017 at 12:22 pm Leave a comment

Anglesea coal mine

The Lofoten Declaration argues that Climate Leadership Requires a Managed Decline of Fossil Fuel Production. Climate Action Moreland has endorsed this important declaration that has been signed by many Non Government Organisation around the world, large and small.

We think it is time Australia started the managed reduction of our fossil fuel production and incorporated just transition principles, particularly for the export trade.

At the launch of the declaration in early September 2017 Truls Gulowsen of Greenpeace Norway said, “The world already has access to more oil, coal, and gas than we can afford to burn if we hope to stay within the Paris climate goals. It is imperative that we stop exploring and expanding into new reserves, and instead start thinking about how we are going to have a just transition away from our dangerous dependence on fossil fuels.”

Australian greenhouse gas emissions are estimated at 1.3 per cent of global emissions, but if you factor export coal (estimated at 3.3 percent of global emissions) and Liquified Natural Gas (LNG), we produce over 5 per cent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions when these fossil fuels are burnt. (See Christoff 2012)

Researchers have estimated that 95 per cent of Australia’s coal, 88 percent of global coal reserves need to remain unburnt to meet the Paris Agreement climate commitments without using Carbon Capture and Storage technology. (McGlade and Ekins 2015)

Australia is already on the path to energy transition in phasing out coal and gas for electyricity and power with increasing renewables, storage technologies and new data driven approaches such as demand reduction.

With a structurally declining global coal market Australia needs to manage the phaseout of fossil fuel production for the global export market. A Managed phase out can be done to ensure just transition outcomes for workers employed in the coal and gas industries and also allow established businesses to adapt and change their business model.

The Lofoten Declaration is also a statement of solidarity and support for the inspiring and growing wave of resistance from impacted and frontline communities around the world, who are taking action to defend and protect their lives and livelihoods in the face of fossil fuel extraction and deadly climate impacts.

Here in Australia we need to support the Wangan and Jagalingou Traditional Owners who continue to reject the Adani mine proposal in the Galilee basin of Queensland.

Thuli Makama of Oil Change International, speaking from Swaziland, said: “We know that we cannot waste time waiting for politicians to catch up. From Sierra Leone to Mozambique and other parts of the globe, one can’t deny the connection. We stand with and support those across the globe who are rising to protect their communities, one project at a time.”

“Political inaction in the face of the climate crisis is scandalous…” saaid Hannah McKinnon of Oil Change International. “We are in a deep hole with climate, and we must stop digging ourselves in deeper.”

Read the declaration below. Visit the Lofoten declaration website to see the full list of signatories (including us)


Lofoten Declaration

Climate Leadership Requires a Managed Decline of Fossil Fuel Production

Global climate change is a crisis of unprecedented scale, and it will take unprecedented action to avoid the worst consequences of our dependence on oil, coal, and gas. Equally as critical as reducing demand and emissions is the need for immediate and ambitious action to stop exploration and expansion of fossil fuel projects and manage the decline of existing production in line with what is necessary to achieve the Paris climate goals.

Clean, safe, and renewable fuels are already redefining how we see energy and it is time for nations to fully embrace 21st century energy and phase out fossil fuels.

The Lofoten Declaration affirms that it is the urgent responsibility and moral obligation of wealthy fossil fuel producers to lead in putting an end to fossil fuel development and to manage the decline of existing production.

We stand in solidarity with, and offer our full support for, the growing wave of impacted communities around the world who are taking action to defend and protect their lives and livelihoods in the face of fossil fuel extraction and climate change. It is a priority to elevate these efforts. Frontline communities are the leaders we must look to as we all work together for a safer future.

A global transition to a low carbon future is already well underway. Continued expansion of oil, coal, and gas is only serving to hinder the inevitable transition while at the same time exacerbating conflicts, fuelling corruption, threatening biodiversity, clean water and air, and infringing on the rights of Indigenous Peoples and vulnerable communities.

Energy access and demand are and must now be met fully through the clean energies of the 21st century. Assertions that new fossil fuels are needed for this transformation are not only inaccurate; they also undermine the speed and penetration of clean energy.
We recognize that a full transition away from fossil fuels will take decades, but also, that this shift is an opportunity more than a burden. We are in a deep hole with climate. We must begin by not digging ourselves any deeper.

Research shows that the carbon embedded in existing fossil fuel production will take us far beyond safe climate limits. Thus, not only are new exploration and new production incompatible with limiting global warming to well below 2ºC (and as close to 1.5ºC as possible), but many existing projects will need to be phased-out faster than their natural decline.

This task should be first addressed by countries, regions, and corporate actors who are best positioned in terms of wealth and capacity to undergo an ambitious just transition away from fossil fuel production. In particular, leadership must come from countries that are high-income, have benefitted from fossil fuel extraction, and that are historically responsible for significant emissions.

We call on these governments and companies to recognize that continued fossil fuel exploration and production without a managed decline and a just transition is irreconcilable with meaningful climate action. We also note that there are tremendous leadership opportunities for these countries to demonstrate that moving beyond oil, coal, and gas – both demand and production – is not only possible, but can be done while protecting workers, communities, and economies.


References:
Christophe McGlade & Paul Ekins, 2015, The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused when limiting global warming to 2 °C, Nature 517, 187–190 (08 January 2015) doi:10.1038/nature14016 (abstract)

Peter Christoff, Why Australia must stop exporting coal, The Conversation, November 2, 2012.

Anglesea coal mine

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Adani, coal export, news, Policy.

Darebin Council adopts climate emergency plan Stop Adani people sign in Princes Park October 7

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Share

Climate Reality Check

Read David Spratt's Climate Reality Check:
20160316-Spratt-After-Paris-counting-the-cost-cover

End of Coal – Replace Havelwood

Download our Hazelwood Primer:
Replace-Hazelwood-Primer-Cover

Climate Emergency petition

Bonn COP23

UNFCCC climate conferenceNovember 6th, 2017
20 days to go.

Follow Climate Action Moreland on Twitter

This is the current C02 in our atmosphere. We need to get it below 350 for a safe climate.

Current CO2 concentration in the atmosphere

Archives

Visitors to this site


%d bloggers like this: